Small_nws_excemption3 Brahms: Symphony No. 2, 2nd Mvt.

Orchestral Excerpts | Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor / Eric Kim, Cello
Bt_movie_not_in_use Has to seem like you've played it your entire life 00h:00m:10s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Pay attention to the change in pitches in each iteration of the melody 00h:00m:25s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Eric plays the excerpt 00h:02m:11s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Challenge of keeping the long line going: shifts, bow changes 00h:03m:27s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Starting with an upbow keeps the line smoother 00h:05m:44s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Practice everything slurred, without any articulation (ignoring the tenuti) 00h:06m:45s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Conceive of the excerpt in three big parts 00h:08m:40s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Break up the slurs into 4+4 00h:09m:21s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Don't get too loud too soon with the crescendo 00h:09m:42s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Vibrato shows the kind of color you are presenting 00h:11m:26s
Bt_movie_not_in_use If vibrato is too fast it might sound nervous 00h:11m:42s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Speed of vibrato should change according to direction of the line 00h:12m:00s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Hold final F-sharp long enough to pass the line off to the violins/flute 00h:12m:56s
Bt_movie_not_in_use Sound in the final accompanimental section should be less intense 00h:14m:00s


Eric Kim, former Principal Cello of the Cincinnati Symphony, plays and discusses the beginning of the 2nd movement of Brahms' Symphony No. 2. Introduction by Michael Tilson Thomas.

Composers:
Johannes Brahms

Works:
SYMPHONY NO. 2 IN D MAJOR, OP. 73

Instruments:
Cello

Recorded Date: 05-03-2014



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Michael Tilson Thomas
Conductor

Michael Tilson Thomas is Music Director of the San Francisco Symphony, Founder and Artistic Director of the New World Symphony and Principal Guest Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra. Born in Los Angeles, he is the third generation of his family to follow an artistic career. His grandparents, Boris and Bessie Thomashefsky, were founding members of the Yiddish Theater in America. His father, Ted Thomas, was a producer in the Mercury Theater Company in New York before moving to Los Angeles where he worked in films and television. His mother, Roberta Thomas, was the head of research for Columbia Pictures.

Mr. Tilson Thomas began his formal studies at the University of Southern California where he studied piano with John Crown and conducting and composition with Ingolf Dahl. At age nineteen he was named Music Director of the Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra. He worked with Stravinsky, Boulez, Stockhausen and Copland on premieres of their compositions at Los Angeles' Monday Evening Concerts. During this same period he was the pianist and conductor for Gregor Piatigorsky and Jascha Heifetz.

In 1969, after winning the Koussevitzky Prize at Tanglewood, he was appointed Assistant Conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. That year he also made his New York debut with the Boston Symphony and gained international recognition after replacing Music Director William Steinberg in mid-concert. He was later appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra where he remained until 1974. He was Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic from 1971 to 1979 and a Principal Guest Conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic from 1981 to 1985. His guest conducting includes appearances with the major orchestras of Europe and the United States.
His recorded repertoire of more than 120 discs includes works by composers such as Bach, Beethoven, Mahler, Prokofiev and Stravinsky as well as his pioneering work with the music of Charles Ives, Carl Ruggles, Steve Reich, John Cage, Ingolf Dahl, Morton Feldman, George Gershwin, John McLaughlin and Elvis Costello. He recently finished recording the complete orchestral works of Gustav Mahler with the San Francisco Symphony.

Mr. Tilson Thomas's television work includes a series with the London Symphony Orchestra for BBC Television, the television broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic Young People's Concerts from 1971 to 1977 and numerous productions on PBS Great Performances. Mr. Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony produced a multi-tiered media project, Keeping Score, which includes a television series, web sites, radio programs and programs in schools.
In February 1988 he inaugurated the New World Symphony, an orchestral academy for graduates of prestigious music programs. In addition to their regular season in Miami Beach, they have toured in Austria, France, Great Britain, South America, Japan, Israel, Holland, Italy and the United States. Prior to their January, 2007 appearance at Carnegie Hall, the New World Symphony was profiled in a feature story in The New York Times. New World Symphony graduates have gone on to major positions in orchestras worldwide. In 1991 Mr. Tilson Thomas and the orchestra were presented in a series of benefit concerts for UNICEF in the United States, featuring Audrey Hepburn as narrator of From the Diary of Anne Frank, composed by Mr. Tilson Thomas and commissioned by UNICEF. This piece has since been translated and performed in many languages worldwide.

In August 1995 he led the Pacific Music Festival Orchestra in the premiere of his composition Showa/Shoah, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. Thomas Hampson premiered his settings of poetry by Walt Whitman, Renee Fleming premiered his settings of the poetry of Emily Dickinson and the San Francisco Symphony premiered his concerto for contrabassoon entitled Urban Legend. As a Carnegie Hall Perspectives Artist from 2003 to 2005, he had an evening devoted to his own compositions which included Island Music for four marimbas and percussion, Notturno for solo flute and strings and a new setting of poems by Rainer Maria Rilke. Other compositions include Street Song for brass instruments and Agnegram, an overture for orchestra.

As Principal Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra from 1988 to 1995, Mr. Tilson Thomas led the orchestra on regular tours in Europe, the United States and Japan as well as at the Salzburg Festival. In London he and the orchestra have mounted major festivals focusing on the music of Steve Reich, George Gershwin, Johannes Brahms, Toru Takemitsu, Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov and the School of St. Petersburg, Claude Debussy and Gustav Mahler. As Principal Guest Conductor of the LSO, he continues to lead the orchestra in concerts in London and on tour.
His fifteen-year tenure as Music Director of the San Francisco Symphony has been broadly covered by the international press with feature stories in Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Times of London and The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung among many others. With the San Francisco Symphony he has presented eight summer festivals including ones devoted to the music of Mahler, Stravinsky, Wagner and American Mavericks. With the San Francisco Symphony he has made numerous tours of Europe, United States and the Far East.

Mr. Tilson Thomas is a Chevalier dans l'ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France, was Musical America's Musician of the Year and Conductor of the Year, Gramophone Magazine's Artist of the Year and has been profiled on CBS's 60 Minutes and ABC's Nightline. He has won ten Grammy Awards for his recordings. In 2008 he received the Peabody Award for his radio series for SFS Media, The MTT Files. In 2010, President Obama awarded him with the National Medal of Arts, the highest award given to artists by the United States Government.



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Eric Kim
Cello

Cellist Eric Kim has a diverse career performing throughout the United States, Europe, South America, and the Middle and Far East as a recitalist, chamber musician, and soloist with orchestra.

He joined the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music as professor of cello at the beginning the 2009-10 academic year.

He served as principal cello of the Cincinnati Symphony from 1989 to 2009 and has also held principal cello positions with the San Diego and Denver symphonies.

Having made his solo debut at age 15 with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Kim was a featured soloist with the Juilliard Orchestra on its critically acclaimed tour of the Far East and has appeared as soloist with the symphony orchestras of Cincinnati, Denver, and San Diego.

He has collaborated as soloist with such conductors as Zubin Mehta, Sergiu Comissiona, Lawrence Foster, Alan Gilbert, Paavo Jarvi, Gianandrea Noseda, and Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, and has appeared in recital in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.

Active as a chamber musician, he has performed with such artists as Emmanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yefim Bronfman, Susan Graham, Lynn Harrell, Stephen Hough, Jaime Laredo, Menahem Pressler, and Gil Shaham, as well as collaborating with members of the Emerson, Guarneri, and Orion string quartets.

At the invitation of violinist Pinchas Zukerman, he performed with Zukerman at the festivals of Athens (Greece), Mostly Mozart (N.Y.), Schleswig-Holstein (Germany), and Verbier (Switzerland).

He has participated in several tours with Zukerman to South America and Israel as a member of the Pinchas Zukerman and Friends chamber ensemble. Highlights include chamber music debuts at Carnegie Hall, Boston's Symphony Hall, and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, performing both Brahms Sextets with Itzhak Perlman, Pinchas Zukerman, and Michael Tree, among others.

Kim can regularly be heard at the festivals of Angel Fire (New Mexico), Aspen, La Jolla, Orcas Island (Wash.), Sangat (India), Santa Fe, and Savannah. He has made several recordings for the RCA, EMI, Telarc, and Koch labels.

As a teacher, he has students in major orchestras throughout the world. He is a regular teacher and performer at the Aspen Music Festival and School as well as the Music Masters Course Japan program held in Yokohama and Tokyo.

Born of Korean parents in New York City, Kim grew up in Illinois, where he began piano studies with his mother at age five. At age 10, he began cello studies with Tanya L. Carey.

He received his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from the Juilliard School, where he studied with Leonard Rose, Lynn Harrell, and Channing Robbins. Upon graduation, Kim received the first William Schuman Prize, awarded for outstanding leadership and achievement in music.