177 results for 'Performances'

Alexa Ciciretti, John Wilson, Zach Manzi, Michael Jarrett, and Zubaida Azezi

Inside The Music: Pathologically Modern - New Paths to New Sound Worlds

Instruments: Cello, Piano, Banjo, Bongo drum, and Xylophone

Discover the myriad paths of modern music from the 20th into the 21st century. What defines new music? Join the Fellows for an intimate glimpse into their craft with these behind-the-scenes presentations on topics ranging from music appreciation to the historic contexts of composers and more. Audience members are encouraged to participate by asking questions and taking part in post-presentation discussions. Alexa Ciciretti, second-year Cello Fellow at the New World Symphony, has performed as a member of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Aspen Chamber Symphony, American Academy of Conducting at Aspen, Eastman Philharmonia and Oberlin Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra. She served as principal cellist in the Oberlin Orchestra’s Carnegie Hall concert and the Eastman Philharmonia’s concert with Itzhak Perlman. In 2014 she was a soloist with the Eastman Wind Ensemble on a concert featuring works by André Previn. She was also a finalist in the Oberlin Concerto Competition and has performed in masterclasses for Steven Isserlis and Ronald Leonard. An avid advocate for Baroque and Contemporary music, Ms. Ciciretti has performed with the Oberlin Baroque Orchestra, Eastman Collegium Musicum, Rochester Christ Church Consort and Eastman and Oberlin Viola da Gamba Consorts. She performed with Oberlin’s Contemporary Music Ensemble at the DiMenna Center, Eastman’s Musica Nova on a concert featuring Irvine Arditti, and on the Bowdoin Gamper Festival of Contemporary Music. Ms. Ciciretti has won numerous prizes including the Eastman Anne Hayden McQuay Scholarship, Oberlin Ernest Hatch Wilkins Memorial Prize for Academic Excellence, Oberlin Pi Kappa Lambda Prize for Musicianship, Aspen New Horizons Fellowship, and the American Academy of Conducting at Aspen Orchestral String Fellowship. She has also attended Bowdoin International Music Festival, Orford Arts Center Academy and Meadowmount School of Music. Ms. Ciciretti received her master’s degree and orchestral studies diploma from Eastman School of Music (2015) and her bachelor of music degree with a minor in historical performance from Oberlin Conservatory (2013). She also studied at the NEC Preparatory Division (2006-09). Principal teachers include Steven Doane, Amir Eldan and Ronald Lowry. Other important influences include Darrett Adkins, Brian Alegant, Kathleen Kemp, Cathy Meints, Raphael Jimenez and Nancy Eaton. When not playing cello, she enjoys cooking, eating chocolate and enjoying the weather in her native New England.

Zach Manzi

2017 Side by Side Excerpt: Clarinet, Rossini, Overture Semiramide

Gioacchino Rossini

Instrument: Clarinet

Semiramide (Italian pronunciation: [semiˈraːmide]) is an opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto by Gaetano Rossi is based on Voltaire's tragedy Semiramis, which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.[1][2] The opera was first performed at La Fenice in Venice on 3 February 1823. Semiramide was Rossini's final Italian opera and according to Richard Osborne, "could well be dubbed Tancredi Revisited".[3] As in Tancredi, Rossi's libretto was based on a Voltaire tragedy. The music took the form of a return to vocal traditions of Rossini's youth, and was a melodrama in which he "recreated the baroque tradition of decorative singing with unparalleled skill".[4] The ensemble-scenes (particularly the duos between Arsace and Semiramide) and choruses are of a high order, as is the orchestral writing, which makes full use of a large pit. After this splendid work, one of his finest in the genre, Rossini turned his back on Italy and moved to Paris. Apart from Il viaggio a Reims, which is still in Italian, his last operas were either original compositions in French or extensively reworked adaptations into French of earlier Italian operas. Musicologist Rodolfo Celletti sums up the importance of Semiramide by stating: "(It) was the last opera of the great Baroque tradition: the most beautiful, the most imaginative, possibly the most complete; but also, irremediably, the last".[5]

Darren Hicks

2017 Side By Side Excerpt: Oboe, Debussy, Nuages and Fetes from Nocturnes

Claude Debussy

Instrument: Bassoon

The three movements are: Nuages ("Clouds") Modéré – Un peu animé – Tempo I – Plus lent – Encore plus lent. Fêtes ("Festivals") Animé et très rythmé – Un peu plus animé – Modéré (mais toujours très rythmé) – Tempo I – De plus en plus sonore et en serrant le mouvement – Même Mouvement. Sirènes ("Sirens") Modérément animé – Un peu plus lent – En animant, surtout dans l’expression – Revenir progressivement au Tempo I – En augmentant peu à peu – Tempo I – Plus lent et en retenant jusqu’à la fin. The three movements were inspired by a series of impressionist paintings, also entitled "Nocturnes" by James Abbott McNeill Whistler.[3] Debussy wrote an "introductory note" to Nocturnes as follows: "The title Nocturnes is to be interpreted here in a general and, more particularly, in a decorative sense. Therefore, it is not meant to designate the usual form of the Nocturne, but rather all the various impressions and the special effects of light that the word suggests. 'Nuages' renders the immutable aspect of the sky and the slow, solemn motion of the clouds, fading away in grey tones lightly tinged with white. 'Fêtes' gives us the vibrating, dancing rhythm of the atmosphere with sudden flashes of light. There is also the episode of the procession (a dazzling fantastic vision), which passes through the festive scene and becomes merged in it. But the background remains resistantly the same: the festival with its blending of music and luminous dust participating in the cosmic rhythm. 'Sirènes' depicts the sea and its countless rhythms and presently, amongst the waves silvered by the moonlight, is heard the mysterious song of the Sirens as they laugh and pass on."[4] Nuages and Fêtes were premiered by Camille Chevillard with the Lamoureux Orchestra on 9 December 1900 in Paris. The complete suite was first heard under the same forces on 27 October 1901. The initial performances met with a cool response from critics and the public, but today these are considered some of Debussy's most accessible and popular works, admired for their beauty.[3] The music lasts for about 25 minutes.[3]

Ansel Norris

2017 Side By Side Excerpt: Trumpet, Debussy – Nuages and Fetes from Nocturnes

Claude Debussy

Instrument: Trumpet

The three movements are: Nuages ("Clouds") Modéré – Un peu animé – Tempo I – Plus lent – Encore plus lent. Fêtes ("Festivals") Animé et très rythmé – Un peu plus animé – Modéré (mais toujours très rythmé) – Tempo I – De plus en plus sonore et en serrant le mouvement – Même Mouvement. Sirènes ("Sirens") Modérément animé – Un peu plus lent – En animant, surtout dans l’expression – Revenir progressivement au Tempo I – En augmentant peu à peu – Tempo I – Plus lent et en retenant jusqu’à la fin. The three movements were inspired by a series of impressionist paintings, also entitled "Nocturnes" by James Abbott McNeill Whistler.[3] Debussy wrote an "introductory note" to Nocturnes as follows: "The title Nocturnes is to be interpreted here in a general and, more particularly, in a decorative sense. Therefore, it is not meant to designate the usual form of the Nocturne, but rather all the various impressions and the special effects of light that the word suggests. 'Nuages' renders the immutable aspect of the sky and the slow, solemn motion of the clouds, fading away in grey tones lightly tinged with white. 'Fêtes' gives us the vibrating, dancing rhythm of the atmosphere with sudden flashes of light. There is also the episode of the procession (a dazzling fantastic vision), which passes through the festive scene and becomes merged in it. But the background remains resistantly the same: the festival with its blending of music and luminous dust participating in the cosmic rhythm. 'Sirènes' depicts the sea and its countless rhythms and presently, amongst the waves silvered by the moonlight, is heard the mysterious song of the Sirens as they laugh and pass on."[4] Nuages and Fêtes were premiered by Camille Chevillard with the Lamoureux Orchestra on 9 December 1900 in Paris. The complete suite was first heard under the same forces on 27 October 1901. The initial performances met with a cool response from critics and the public, but today these are considered some of Debussy's most accessible and popular works, admired for their beauty.[3] The music lasts for about 25 minutes.[3]

Joseph Peterson

2017 Side by Side Excerpt: Trombone, Rossini, Overture Semiramide

Gioacchino Rossini

Instrument: Trombone

Semiramide (Italian pronunciation: [semiˈraːmide]) is an opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto by Gaetano Rossi is based on Voltaire's tragedy Semiramis, which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.[1][2] The opera was first performed at La Fenice in Venice on 3 February 1823. Semiramide was Rossini's final Italian opera and according to Richard Osborne, "could well be dubbed Tancredi Revisited".[3] As in Tancredi, Rossi's libretto was based on a Voltaire tragedy. The music took the form of a return to vocal traditions of Rossini's youth, and was a melodrama in which he "recreated the baroque tradition of decorative singing with unparalleled skill".[4] The ensemble-scenes (particularly the duos between Arsace and Semiramide) and choruses are of a high order, as is the orchestral writing, which makes full use of a large pit. After this splendid work, one of his finest in the genre, Rossini turned his back on Italy and moved to Paris. Apart from Il viaggio a Reims, which is still in Italian, his last operas were either original compositions in French or extensively reworked adaptations into French of earlier Italian operas. Musicologist Rodolfo Celletti sums up the importance of Semiramide by stating: "(It) was the last opera of the great Baroque tradition: the most beautiful, the most imaginative, possibly the most complete; but also, irremediably, the last".[5]

Kevin Gobetz

2017 Side by Side Excerpt: Double Bass, Rossini, Overture Semiramide

Gioacchino Rossini

Instrument: Double Bass

Semiramide (Italian pronunciation: [semiˈraːmide]) is an opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto by Gaetano Rossi is based on Voltaire's tragedy Semiramis, which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.[1][2] The opera was first performed at La Fenice in Venice on 3 February 1823. Semiramide was Rossini's final Italian opera and according to Richard Osborne, "could well be dubbed Tancredi Revisited".[3] As in Tancredi, Rossi's libretto was based on a Voltaire tragedy. The music took the form of a return to vocal traditions of Rossini's youth, and was a melodrama in which he "recreated the baroque tradition of decorative singing with unparalleled skill".[4] The ensemble-scenes (particularly the duos between Arsace and Semiramide) and choruses are of a high order, as is the orchestral writing, which makes full use of a large pit. After this splendid work, one of his finest in the genre, Rossini turned his back on Italy and moved to Paris. Apart from Il viaggio a Reims, which is still in Italian, his last operas were either original compositions in French or extensively reworked adaptations into French of earlier Italian operas. Musicologist Rodolfo Celletti sums up the importance of Semiramide by stating: "(It) was the last opera of the great Baroque tradition: the most beautiful, the most imaginative, possibly the most complete; but also, irremediably, the last".[5]

Kelly Zimba

2017 Side by Side Excerpt: Flute, Rossini, Overture Semiramide

Gioacchino Rossini

Instrument: Flute

Semiramide (Italian pronunciation: [semiˈraːmide]) is an opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto by Gaetano Rossi is based on Voltaire's tragedy Semiramis, which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.[1][2] The opera was first performed at La Fenice in Venice on 3 February 1823. Semiramide was Rossini's final Italian opera and according to Richard Osborne, "could well be dubbed Tancredi Revisited".[3] As in Tancredi, Rossi's libretto was based on a Voltaire tragedy. The music took the form of a return to vocal traditions of Rossini's youth, and was a melodrama in which he "recreated the baroque tradition of decorative singing with unparalleled skill".[4] The ensemble-scenes (particularly the duos between Arsace and Semiramide) and choruses are of a high order, as is the orchestral writing, which makes full use of a large pit. After this splendid work, one of his finest in the genre, Rossini turned his back on Italy and moved to Paris. Apart from Il viaggio a Reims, which is still in Italian, his last operas were either original compositions in French or extensively reworked adaptations into French of earlier Italian operas. Musicologist Rodolfo Celletti sums up the importance of Semiramide by stating: "(It) was the last opera of the great Baroque tradition: the most beautiful, the most imaginative, possibly the most complete; but also, irremediably, the last".[5]

Caroline Gilbert

2017 Side By Side Excerpt: Violin, Debussy – Nuages and Fetes from Nocturnes

Claude Debussy

Instrument: Viola

Nuages ("Clouds") Modéré – Un peu animé – Tempo I – Plus lent – Encore plus lent. Fêtes ("Festivals") Animé et très rythmé – Un peu plus animé – Modéré (mais toujours très rythmé) – Tempo I – De plus en plus sonore et en serrant le mouvement – Même Mouvement. Sirènes ("Sirens") Modérément animé – Un peu plus lent – En animant, surtout dans l’expression – Revenir progressivement au Tempo I – En augmentant peu à peu – Tempo I – Plus lent et en retenant jusqu’à la fin. The three movements were inspired by a series of impressionist paintings, also entitled "Nocturnes" by James Abbott McNeill Whistler.[3] Debussy wrote an "introductory note" to Nocturnes as follows: "The title Nocturnes is to be interpreted here in a general and, more particularly, in a decorative sense. Therefore, it is not meant to designate the usual form of the Nocturne, but rather all the various impressions and the special effects of light that the word suggests. 'Nuages' renders the immutable aspect of the sky and the slow, solemn motion of the clouds, fading away in grey tones lightly tinged with white. 'Fêtes' gives us the vibrating, dancing rhythm of the atmosphere with sudden flashes of light. There is also the episode of the procession (a dazzling fantastic vision), which passes through the festive scene and becomes merged in it. But the background remains resistantly the same: the festival with its blending of music and luminous dust participating in the cosmic rhythm. 'Sirènes' depicts the sea and its countless rhythms and presently, amongst the waves silvered by the moonlight, is heard the mysterious song of the Sirens as they laugh and pass on."[4] Nuages and Fêtes were premiered by Camille Chevillard with the Lamoureux Orchestra on 9 December 1900 in Paris. The complete suite was first heard under the same forces on 27 October 1901. The initial performances met with a cool response from critics and the public, but today these are considered some of Debussy's most accessible and popular works, admired for their beauty.[3] The music lasts for about 25 minutes.[3]